Stuff 2 - The Kitchen Chair:

The next installment of my latest round of sentimental nonsense will be familiar to anyone who has known our family well at any point over the last 50 years.

To frighten any friends from Oswestry this means that you have known me or my family for at least 30 years.

The Kitchen is the heart of any home in my opinion and anyone who visited Roft Street will remember the kitchen in my Mum and Dad's house. For those who don't know it Trinity House is a Double-Fronted Georgian townhouse with bay windows. It was our family home from 1978 when we moved from Hertfordshire to Shropshire. The kitchen was spacious, but not cavernous, warm & comforting. The chair was a familiar fixture in the kitchen, and sat in a perfect position between my Mum's Welsh dresser and the kitchen door & close to the dining table.

My Father as he often did picked it up in some long-forgotten saleroom or antique shop in Hertfordshire in the early 70s. And it has been a fixture in our home ever since.

Now just for a change I've actually done a little research, which will surprise anyone who knows me. It's actually called a Windsor Chair.

This type of chair was being produced from as early as the 16th century and is thought to be based on Welsh, Irish or West Country Stick-back chairs whose history dates back to much earlier times.

The characteristics of these types of chairs are very similar in that they are basically a stool with morticed legs and a spindled back, which is often held in place with pegs or wedges. The thick seat is often made from elm because the grain pattern tends to be quite attractive to the eye.

The back and legs as well as the armrests tend to be made from other native woods such as Beach, Ash, Cherry Walnut or sometimes Yew. In the case of our chair I have no idea of the materials used, or its actual age.

It's called a Windsor Chair because the earliest known manufacturers were based in the area of the Thames Valley around Windsor and Slough in the 16th century. Apparently it started out with Wagonmakers turning their hand to the production of chairs, over the years demand grew and by the peak of their popularity in the 19th century there were many manufacturers across the UK turning out their own versions of the Windsor Chair.

But this isn't really just a chair, it's way more than that. This is where you sit when you're reading Dr Suess or Roald Dahl to your Child or Grandchild. This is the chair that your dearest friend sits in when they're visiting. This is where your neighbour sits when they bring the children over the road to have a cup of tea & a change of scenery. This is where you soothe nerves, calm tempers, bandage knees, receive comfort or just quietly read David Eddings.

This is the chair that has been sat at the heart of our family home for as long as I can remember & longer. It has been involved in countless occasions of so many types that I can't list them.

How did it come to me? Simple really, when my parents moved from Oswestry to Llanidloes they were moving to a much smaller house, but couldn't bear for the chair to leave the family, so I was asked to look after it for a while.

It's been here in Gorleston ever since and we love it

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